• Congo: Blood, gold and mobile phones

    Democratic Republic of Congo's rush for an estimated £15tn in gold and rare earth minerals is fuelling a culture of violence and forced labour and exploiting some of the most vulnerable people on earth. At Kamituva gold mine in South Kivu Province, women are raped while men work for 33p per day

    published: 06 Sep 2011
  • 'COLTAN' Millions Die For Minerals In Congo, For Western Use

    That's right. COLTAN is a mineral used for many devises we use today such as I PHONES, Playstation and much more. There are never any coverage in the news showing the total deaths of the Congo people, fighting to protect their minerals. Why? Does all black lives not matter? Africa is not how they portray on TV. Africa is full of wealth and this is what the Western Leaders are all trying to get their dirty murdering hands on. Enjoy the short film.

    published: 05 Feb 2017
  • Conflict Minerals, Rebels and Child Soldiers in Congo

    Warlords, soldiers, and child laborers all toil over a mineral you've never even heard of. Coltan is a conflict mineral in nearly every cell phone, laptop, and electronic device. It's also tied to the deaths of over 5 million people in Congo since 1990. Hosted by Alison Suroosh Alvi | Originally released in 2011 at http://vice.com Click here to help: http://www.raisehopeforcongo.org/ Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Presents Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com

    published: 22 May 2012
  • DR CONGO - Conflict on Coltan

    A feature about the mining of conflict minerals like coltan in south kivu /Eastern DRC.

    published: 04 Feb 2016
  • REPORT: Child Labor In The Congo Used To Make Your Phone

    Amnesty International is calling out major tech manufacturers – including Apple, Microsoft, Sony and others for their alleged links to illegally-sourced cobalt in the volatile Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Children are forced to work in subhuman conditions and under constant threat of violence. The organization says the mineral used in household appliances the world over is largely sourced from child labor that goes on deep inside hazardous mines and tunnels... Read More At: https://www.rt.com/news/329420-amnesty-cobalt-child-labor-apple/ Clip from The Kyle Kulinski Show, which airs live on Blog Talk Radio and Secular Talk Radio Monday - Friday 4:00 - 5:30 PM Eastern time zone. Check out our website - and become a member - at: http://www.SecularTalkRadio.com Listen to the Live...

    published: 20 Jan 2016
  • Truth about your cellphones and the Congo

    published: 29 Jan 2017
  • Special report : Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children

    It is an essential part of most mobile gadgets sold around the world and demand for cobalt is soaring. But the process of extracting the mineral from the earth comes at a huge human cost. A Sky News investigation has found children as young as four working in dangerous and squalid conditions in Cobalt mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for as little as 8p a day. Sky's special correspondent Alex Crawford reports. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone htt...

    published: 27 Feb 2017
  • Your Cell Phone Might Be Powered By Child Labor

    Fifty percent of the world's cobalt comes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where children as young as seven mine the rare metal, which is used in lithium-ion batteries. Amnesty International wants tech companies to be more vigilant. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus

    published: 21 Jan 2016
  • Blood in the Mobile: Mining in the Congo

    http://academicvideostore.com to purchase full length streaming movie. We all love our mobile phones. They connect us to our family and friends. But, they also connect us to with the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of the most dangerous places on earth. Inside our mobile phones are illegally mined minerals, minerals that fuel conflict. Blood in the mobile is a film about human courage, about hope, and the search for solutions. What do you think? Film brought to you by Filmakers Library.

    published: 12 Aug 2011
  • Congo calling back: Bandi Mbubi at TEDxExeter

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Bandi Mbubi's talk at TEDxExeter 2012 was featured on TED.com. He has returned with an update about his work with the Congo Calling campaign, and how our actions are beginning to make a difference. Congo Calling was launched at TEDxExeter 2012 following Bandi Mbubi's powerful call for the development of fair trade technology which uses ethically-sourced, conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). We are delighted to welcome Bandi back to TEDxExeter to share the many successes of Congo Calling and his vision for the campaign. "My wish is to convince everyone to do one simple thing: to insist on fairly traded mobile phones, tablets, and games consoles, and in so doing, t...

    published: 29 Apr 2014
  • Congo creates francophone Africa's first mobile phones

    Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe When Vérone Mankou hit a few snags in his quest to build a low-cost laptop, he did not give up. Instead he simply transformed his project and now is the proud creator of the first mobile phones "designed and assembled" in Francophone Africa. Follow AFP English on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AFPnewsenglish Latest news on AFP English Twitter: https://twitter.com/AFP Share your top stories on Google+ http://bit.ly/AFP-Gplus

    published: 31 Jul 2015
  • Smartphones: The world in your pocket - The Congolese Blood in your hand

    Google, Apple, Intel and other tech companies revealed that minerals sold to fund combattants in the Democratic Republic of Congo and nearby countries may be used in the manufacture of their gadgets. Everyday its an emergency in east of Congo due to crisis war and sexual violence. The disclosures come thanks to the reform-focused Dodd-Frank Act, which now requires thousands of companies to release an annual report detailing the use of so-called conflict minerals. Tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold-products common in electronics and known collectively as "3TG" are mined heavily in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other central African countries. Proceeds from some of the mines are used to fun an ongoing war that's become the deadliest armed conflict since World War 2, according to on...

    published: 09 Mar 2015
  • Cobalt mining for phones: How you could be holding a product of child labour

    The Chinese mining company Hauyou has refused to apologise after Sky News found that it was sourcing cobalt mined by children as young as four. We've also discovered that Apple has told Huayou to suspend all sourcing from mines until they can be checked to be free of child labour. Here's our Technology correspondent Tom Cheshire. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/app...

    published: 28 Feb 2017
  • 初のフランス語圏アフリカ産携帯電話、コンゴ Congo: first phones manufactured in francophone Africa

    コンゴ共和国で双方向通信・インターネット技術会社「VMK」を経営するのベローヌ・マンクー(Verone Mankou)氏は、低価格のラップトップPCを生産しようとしたとき、いくつかの障害にぶつかったが、それでもあきらめなかった。代わりにプロジェクトを路線変更し、いまやフランス語圏アフリカで「デザインから組み立てまで」を行った初の携帯電話の考案者となった。映像はVMKの工場。20日撮影。(c)AFP 2015年7月31日 When Vérone Mankou hit a few snags in his quest to build a low-cost laptop, he did not give up. Instead he simply transformed his project and now is the proud creator of the first mobile phones "designed and assembled" in Francophone Africa. チャンネル登録はこちらから https://www.youtube.com/user/afpbbnews 動画のお問い合わせはこちらから https://www.afpbb.com/list/helpaboutsite/regist

    published: 31 Jul 2015
  • Conflict Cell Phones - The Horror We Are All Responsible For - Conspiracy Files

    Conflict cellphones are casuing a war in the Congo that every one of us is responsible for. A nearly two decade long war in the eastern Congo has been the deadliest in the world since World War II. That means worse than Korea, Vietnam, all the conflicts the Middle East. Why don't we ever hear anything about it? Why the cover up? According to a study released by the International Rescue Committee, an estimated 5.4 million people have been killed in the the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1996. That's a death toll equivalent to the entire population of Colorado. 45,000 deaths occur every month!! And all this is taking place in an International news media blackout. In addition hundreds of thousands of women have been raped over the past decade. Who is responsible for this ...

    published: 31 Oct 2016
  • This is what we die for: Child labour in the DRC cobalt mines

    This film documents the hazardous conditions in which artisanal miners, including thousands of children, mine cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It goes on to trace how this cobalt is used to power mobile phones, laptop computers, and other portable electronic devices. Using basic hand tools, miners dig out rocks from tunnels deep underground, and accidents are common. Despite the potentially fatal health effects of prolonged exposure to cobalt, adult and child miners work without even the most basic protective equipment. MUSIC BY NIRAJ CHAG

    published: 19 Jan 2016
Congo: Blood, gold and mobile phones

Congo: Blood, gold and mobile phones

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:47
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2011
  • views: 6307
videos
Democratic Republic of Congo's rush for an estimated £15tn in gold and rare earth minerals is fuelling a culture of violence and forced labour and exploiting some of the most vulnerable people on earth. At Kamituva gold mine in South Kivu Province, women are raped while men work for 33p per day
https://wn.com/Congo_Blood,_Gold_And_Mobile_Phones
'COLTAN' Millions Die For Minerals In Congo, For Western Use

'COLTAN' Millions Die For Minerals In Congo, For Western Use

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:56
  • Updated: 05 Feb 2017
  • views: 110
videos
That's right. COLTAN is a mineral used for many devises we use today such as I PHONES, Playstation and much more. There are never any coverage in the news showing the total deaths of the Congo people, fighting to protect their minerals. Why? Does all black lives not matter? Africa is not how they portray on TV. Africa is full of wealth and this is what the Western Leaders are all trying to get their dirty murdering hands on. Enjoy the short film.
https://wn.com/'COLTAN'_Millions_Die_For_Minerals_In_Congo,_For_Western_Use
Conflict Minerals, Rebels and Child Soldiers in Congo

Conflict Minerals, Rebels and Child Soldiers in Congo

  • Order:
  • Duration: 38:02
  • Updated: 22 May 2012
  • views: 1927331
videos
Warlords, soldiers, and child laborers all toil over a mineral you've never even heard of. Coltan is a conflict mineral in nearly every cell phone, laptop, and electronic device. It's also tied to the deaths of over 5 million people in Congo since 1990. Hosted by Alison Suroosh Alvi | Originally released in 2011 at http://vice.com Click here to help: http://www.raisehopeforcongo.org/ Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Presents Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
https://wn.com/Conflict_Minerals,_Rebels_And_Child_Soldiers_In_Congo
DR CONGO - Conflict on Coltan

DR CONGO - Conflict on Coltan

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:32
  • Updated: 04 Feb 2016
  • views: 222
videos
A feature about the mining of conflict minerals like coltan in south kivu /Eastern DRC.
https://wn.com/Dr_Congo_Conflict_On_Coltan
REPORT: Child Labor In The Congo Used To Make Your Phone

REPORT: Child Labor In The Congo Used To Make Your Phone

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:54
  • Updated: 20 Jan 2016
  • views: 22790
videos
Amnesty International is calling out major tech manufacturers – including Apple, Microsoft, Sony and others for their alleged links to illegally-sourced cobalt in the volatile Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Children are forced to work in subhuman conditions and under constant threat of violence. The organization says the mineral used in household appliances the world over is largely sourced from child labor that goes on deep inside hazardous mines and tunnels... Read More At: https://www.rt.com/news/329420-amnesty-cobalt-child-labor-apple/ Clip from The Kyle Kulinski Show, which airs live on Blog Talk Radio and Secular Talk Radio Monday - Friday 4:00 - 5:30 PM Eastern time zone. Check out our website - and become a member - at: http://www.SecularTalkRadio.com Listen to the Live Show or On Demand archive at: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kylekulinski Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/kylekulinski Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecularTalk Friends Of SecularTalk: http://www.facebook.com/beastofreason AMAZON LINK: (Bookmark this link to support the show for free!!!) http://www.amazon.com/?tag=seculacom-20
https://wn.com/Report_Child_Labor_In_The_Congo_Used_To_Make_Your_Phone
Truth about your cellphones and the Congo

Truth about your cellphones and the Congo

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:24
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2017
  • views: 1256
videos
https://wn.com/Truth_About_Your_Cellphones_And_The_Congo
Special report : Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children

Special report : Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:17
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2017
  • views: 2324
videos
It is an essential part of most mobile gadgets sold around the world and demand for cobalt is soaring. But the process of extracting the mineral from the earth comes at a huge human cost. A Sky News investigation has found children as young as four working in dangerous and squalid conditions in Cobalt mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for as little as 8p a day. Sky's special correspondent Alex Crawford reports. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
https://wn.com/Special_Report_Inside_The_Congo_Cobalt_Mines_That_Exploit_Children
Your Cell Phone Might Be Powered By Child Labor

Your Cell Phone Might Be Powered By Child Labor

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:32
  • Updated: 21 Jan 2016
  • views: 7466
videos
Fifty percent of the world's cobalt comes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where children as young as seven mine the rare metal, which is used in lithium-ion batteries. Amnesty International wants tech companies to be more vigilant. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
https://wn.com/Your_Cell_Phone_Might_Be_Powered_By_Child_Labor
Blood in the Mobile: Mining in the Congo

Blood in the Mobile: Mining in the Congo

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:40
  • Updated: 12 Aug 2011
  • views: 26069
videos
http://academicvideostore.com to purchase full length streaming movie. We all love our mobile phones. They connect us to our family and friends. But, they also connect us to with the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of the most dangerous places on earth. Inside our mobile phones are illegally mined minerals, minerals that fuel conflict. Blood in the mobile is a film about human courage, about hope, and the search for solutions. What do you think? Film brought to you by Filmakers Library.
https://wn.com/Blood_In_The_Mobile_Mining_In_The_Congo
Congo calling back: Bandi Mbubi at TEDxExeter

Congo calling back: Bandi Mbubi at TEDxExeter

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2014
  • views: 1027
videos
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Bandi Mbubi's talk at TEDxExeter 2012 was featured on TED.com. He has returned with an update about his work with the Congo Calling campaign, and how our actions are beginning to make a difference. Congo Calling was launched at TEDxExeter 2012 following Bandi Mbubi's powerful call for the development of fair trade technology which uses ethically-sourced, conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). We are delighted to welcome Bandi back to TEDxExeter to share the many successes of Congo Calling and his vision for the campaign. "My wish is to convince everyone to do one simple thing: to insist on fairly traded mobile phones, tablets, and games consoles, and in so doing, transform an industry and the world. The illegal trade in minerals for these devices has fuelled two decades of violent war in my home country, the DRC, and in so many others, but one small action by many could help end the violence." — Bandi Mbubi, July 2013. http://www.ted.com/talks/bandi_mbubi_demand_a_fair_trade_cell_phone https://twitter.com/BandiMbubi https://twitter.com/CongoCalling At TEDxExeter 2014 our speakers and performers connected us with other worlds. Our talks exposed corruption in big business, shared effective approaches to tackling social inequality and gave a voice to those whose human rights are under threat. We explored the impact of fast changing technologies on all our lives. We journeyed through fire and forest to frozen landscapes. We were challenged to consider worlds of extremes, cutting edge controversies and risky opportunities. Video Production Chromatrope (http://chromatrope.co.uk/) Production Manager Andy Robertson (http://www.youtube.com/familygamertv) About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
https://wn.com/Congo_Calling_Back_Bandi_Mbubi_At_Tedxexeter
Congo creates francophone Africa's first mobile phones

Congo creates francophone Africa's first mobile phones

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:56
  • Updated: 31 Jul 2015
  • views: 263
videos
Keep up-to-date with the latest news, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/AFP-subscribe When Vérone Mankou hit a few snags in his quest to build a low-cost laptop, he did not give up. Instead he simply transformed his project and now is the proud creator of the first mobile phones "designed and assembled" in Francophone Africa. Follow AFP English on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AFPnewsenglish Latest news on AFP English Twitter: https://twitter.com/AFP Share your top stories on Google+ http://bit.ly/AFP-Gplus
https://wn.com/Congo_Creates_Francophone_Africa's_First_Mobile_Phones
Smartphones: The world in your pocket - The Congolese Blood in your hand

Smartphones: The world in your pocket - The Congolese Blood in your hand

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:27
  • Updated: 09 Mar 2015
  • views: 2125
videos
Google, Apple, Intel and other tech companies revealed that minerals sold to fund combattants in the Democratic Republic of Congo and nearby countries may be used in the manufacture of their gadgets. Everyday its an emergency in east of Congo due to crisis war and sexual violence. The disclosures come thanks to the reform-focused Dodd-Frank Act, which now requires thousands of companies to release an annual report detailing the use of so-called conflict minerals. Tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold-products common in electronics and known collectively as "3TG" are mined heavily in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and other central African countries. Proceeds from some of the mines are used to fun an ongoing war that's become the deadliest armed conflict since World War 2, according to one study. However, because such materials travel through a variety of smelters, manufacturersand distributors before they end up in a phone or laptop, vetting the entire manufacturing line is a difficult, expensive process. The SEC has estimated that compliance with the new rule cost companies $3 to $4 billion in the first year and will cost $206 to $609 million in subsequent years. In regulatory filings, the tech giants continuously said they did not have sufficient data to fully determine whether conflict minerals were present in their products. Google wrote in its filing that "based on our due diligence, we have reason to believe that portion of the 3TG used in our products originated from the covered countries, but we have not identified any instances of sourcing that directly or indirectly supported conflict in the covered countries". The company disclosed that about 36 percent of its smelters in the Democratic republic of the Congo region have been certified as not trafficking in conflict minerals, but it could notmake a firm determination about other suppliers. Apple, which began tracking the practices of individual smelters in 2010, said that 80 percent of the smelters it does business with in the region do not use conflict minerals. But like Google, Apple said it did not know enough to definitively say whether the other suppliers use them. Intel, meanwhile, said that its microprocessors and chipsets are conflict-free, but it could not determine the conflict status of its other products. And Amazon said "majority" of the suppliers that contribute to its kindle pipeline are not using conflict minerals. Every company which made a disclosure said they would pressure their questionable suppliers to be certified as compliant with conflict-free standards. overall, the reports indicate that tech companies are at least advocating for the manufacture of conflict-free products, but they are finding it difficult to implement such initiatives on a practical level. No ones is keen on abandoning the region entirely-despite raised awareness of conflict minerals, the Democratic Republic of the Congo's share of tantalum production actually increased in 2013, according to the Wall street Journal. Some companies even argue that continuing to draw minerals from the region could allow them to be a force for good. "Rather than simply funneling its demand through a limited number of verified smelters or those that are not sourcing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo," Apple wrote, "Apple believes the best way to impact human rights abuses on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo is to have critical mass of smelters verified as conflict-free, so that demand from other questionable sources is reduced."
https://wn.com/Smartphones_The_World_In_Your_Pocket_The_Congolese_Blood_In_Your_Hand
Cobalt mining for phones: How you could be holding a product of child labour

Cobalt mining for phones: How you could be holding a product of child labour

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:49
  • Updated: 28 Feb 2017
  • views: 3078
videos
The Chinese mining company Hauyou has refused to apologise after Sky News found that it was sourcing cobalt mined by children as young as four. We've also discovered that Apple has told Huayou to suspend all sourcing from mines until they can be checked to be free of child labour. Here's our Technology correspondent Tom Cheshire. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
https://wn.com/Cobalt_Mining_For_Phones_How_You_Could_Be_Holding_A_Product_Of_Child_Labour
初のフランス語圏アフリカ産携帯電話、コンゴ Congo: first phones manufactured in francophone Africa

初のフランス語圏アフリカ産携帯電話、コンゴ Congo: first phones manufactured in francophone Africa

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 31 Jul 2015
  • views: 226
videos
コンゴ共和国で双方向通信・インターネット技術会社「VMK」を経営するのベローヌ・マンクー(Verone Mankou)氏は、低価格のラップトップPCを生産しようとしたとき、いくつかの障害にぶつかったが、それでもあきらめなかった。代わりにプロジェクトを路線変更し、いまやフランス語圏アフリカで「デザインから組み立てまで」を行った初の携帯電話の考案者となった。映像はVMKの工場。20日撮影。(c)AFP 2015年7月31日 When Vérone Mankou hit a few snags in his quest to build a low-cost laptop, he did not give up. Instead he simply transformed his project and now is the proud creator of the first mobile phones "designed and assembled" in Francophone Africa. チャンネル登録はこちらから https://www.youtube.com/user/afpbbnews 動画のお問い合わせはこちらから https://www.afpbb.com/list/helpaboutsite/regist
https://wn.com/初のフランス語圏アフリカ産携帯電話、コンゴ_Congo_First_Phones_Manufactured_In_Francophone_Africa
Conflict Cell Phones - The Horror We Are All Responsible For - Conspiracy Files

Conflict Cell Phones - The Horror We Are All Responsible For - Conspiracy Files

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:14
  • Updated: 31 Oct 2016
  • views: 280
videos
Conflict cellphones are casuing a war in the Congo that every one of us is responsible for. A nearly two decade long war in the eastern Congo has been the deadliest in the world since World War II. That means worse than Korea, Vietnam, all the conflicts the Middle East. Why don't we ever hear anything about it? Why the cover up? According to a study released by the International Rescue Committee, an estimated 5.4 million people have been killed in the the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1996. That's a death toll equivalent to the entire population of Colorado. 45,000 deaths occur every month!! And all this is taking place in an International news media blackout. In addition hundreds of thousands of women have been raped over the past decade. Who is responsible for this unspeakable horror? Could it be (pause – point at camera)... you? The protracted wars in the Congo have led to massively wide and diverse violence against civilians by an variety of armed groups. Sexual violence has become a tool of war and control on an immense scale for all the armed groups in the Congo. Both sides. But wait how can you be to blame for this, you are asking? I'll tell you why. Do you own a mobile phone, a laptop computer? A Nintendo or PlayStation? Perhaps you should ask, “How many people died today in order to manufacture my cell phone?” Our cell phones and almost all other electronic equipment contain an essential element called tantalum. Tantalum is comprised of two minerals: columbite and tantalite. The combination of these two elements is known as coltan. And 80 percent of the world’s coltan is mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Extraction and mining of this element has fueled vicious civil wars in the Congo since 1996. Everyone involved in the mining and sale of coltan are part of this civil war. Any household electronic, phone, remote, or a laptop can contain minerals mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Armed rebel groups connected with crimes of rape and murder profit from trade of these minerals. Sale of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the eastern part of the DRC finance the militia groups that contribute to the ongoing violence in the country. These armed groups that reap enormous profits from the mineral trade in eastern Congo regularly commit shocking atrocities as they fight to control the region's most valuable mines. As well as the transportation routes and opportunities to impose taxes on everyone involved in this trade. The world's news media totally ignores this conflict. Could it have anything do do with... well draw your own conclusions why the lives of these victims are so devalued and ignored. The armed groups perpetuating the violence generate an estimated $144 million each year by trading in four main minerals, gold, tantalum, tungsten, and tin. All of of these are required to make our consumer electronics products function properly. The global demand for coltan increased when cell-phone and other electronic manufacturers discovered that this element could be used to make the products more compact. Tantalum capacitors are essential to the miniaturization of our cell phones and other gadgets. Cobalt is an important component of rechargeable batteries in mobile phones, laptops and digital cameras. Since the beginning of 2009 there has been an alarming increase in reports of sexual violence which has coincided with the renewed offensive by the Congolese armed forces against the FDLR, a Rwandan Hutu militia whose leadership was responsible for the Rwandan genocide. Many of these incidents have occurred in and around mineral rich areas of the eastern Congo. Coltan is mined by hand in the Congo by groups of men digging basins in streams and then scraping off the surface mud. A team can mine one kilo of coltan per day. Children work in mines under horrible conditions. Women are violently raped by rebels and soldiers alike and abandoned by their communities. The entire process of putting that cell phone in your pocket results in indescribable horror at every step of the way. Because war costs money weapons, ammunition and equipment have to be purchased, troops must be paid and fed. The armed thugs either occupy the mines and force civilians to work there, or they block the roads and airports on which the minerals are transported so they can illegally tax the drivers, pilots and traders. The Democratic Republic of the Congo is as large as Texas, California, Montana, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and Colorado combined. Within this huge area there are only 300 miles of paved roads. Every day, porters carry 50 kilogram backpacks of this valuable rock across a 40-mile footpath to reach one of the many mines. Only to be met at the end of the trail at gunpoint by government soldiers who refuse reimbursement for their deadly trip.make up to five dollars a day for this work. http://www.facebook.com/conspiracyfiles http://www.youtube.com/conspiracyfiles
https://wn.com/Conflict_Cell_Phones_The_Horror_We_Are_All_Responsible_For_Conspiracy_Files
This is what we die for: Child labour in the DRC cobalt mines

This is what we die for: Child labour in the DRC cobalt mines

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:03
  • Updated: 19 Jan 2016
  • views: 47214
videos
This film documents the hazardous conditions in which artisanal miners, including thousands of children, mine cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It goes on to trace how this cobalt is used to power mobile phones, laptop computers, and other portable electronic devices. Using basic hand tools, miners dig out rocks from tunnels deep underground, and accidents are common. Despite the potentially fatal health effects of prolonged exposure to cobalt, adult and child miners work without even the most basic protective equipment. MUSIC BY NIRAJ CHAG
https://wn.com/This_Is_What_We_Die_For_Child_Labour_In_The_Drc_Cobalt_Mines
×